Friday, 20 October 2017

Margrethe Vestager: The new age of corporate monopolies | TED Talk | TED.com

Margrethe Vestager: The new age of corporate monopolies | TED Talk | TED.com: "Margrethe Vestager wants to keep European markets competitive -- which is why, on behalf of the EU, she's fined Google $2.8 billion for breaching antitrust rules, asked Apple for $15.3 billion in back taxes and investigated a range of companies, from Gazprom to Fiat, for anti-competitive practices. In an important talk about the state of the global business, she explains why markets need clear rules -- and how even the most innovative companies can become a problem when they become too dominant.

"Real and fair competition has a vital role to play in building the trust we need to get the best of our societies," Vestager says. "And that starts with enforcing our rules."" 'via Blog this'

Digital debate will be first test of Tusk's new policy crowbar

Digital debate will be first test of Tusk's new policy crowbar: "In an earlier draft, leaders had said negotiations should finish before the end of 2017 on the free flow of non-personal data, and on the electronic communications code, but in the end the text gave negotiators of these two files until June 2018.

The electronic communications code deals with rules for telecommunication companies.

 They also gave the European Commission, in the final version, slightly more time to come up with "a European approach to artificial intelligence" – by early 2018, instead of by January 2018." 'via Blog this'

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Sussex InfoLaw Research Seminars: Autumn 2017

The programme of autumn seminars (all at 1.30pm Wednesdays, bring your lunch):
8 Nov Freeman G16: Dr. Nicolo Zingales, The rise of Infomediaries and the marketization of data protection law
15 Nov Ashdown AH106: Dr. Andres Guadamuz
22 Nov Ashdown AH106: Dr Maria Frabboni
6 Dec Freeman G16: Prof. Chris Marsden, Net Neutrality and Zero Rating

Monday, 16 October 2017

41 percent of Android phones are vulnerable to 'devastating' Wi-Fi attack - The Verge

41 percent of Android phones are vulnerable to 'devastating' Wi-Fi attack - The Verge: "Android 6.0 and above contains a vulnerability that researchers claim “makes it trivial to intercept and manipulate traffic sent by these Linux and Android devices.”

41 percent of Android devices are vulnerable to an “exceptionally devastating” variant of the Wi-Fi attack that involves manipulating traffic. Attackers might be able to inject ransomware or malware into websites thanks to the attack, and Android devices will require security patches to protect against this.

Google says the company is “aware of the issue, and we will be patching any affected devices in the coming weeks.”" 'via Blog this'

SCL Junior Lawyers' Group event: GDPR in Practice - 6 Nov 2017, Baker/McKenzie London

SCL: SCL Junior Lawyers' Group event: The GDPR in Practice - Monday 6 November 2017, London: "With the GDPR fully effective in just six months' time, how are preparations progressing?
Our speakers are drawn from in-house, private practice and the Bar, and will offer their differing perspectives of implementing and advising on the GDPR.
Matthew Berridge will discuss the HR aspects of GDPR preparation, with a focus on privacy notices and consent, HR input to records of processing, and employee monitoring.
Gideon Shirazi will discuss hacking, data breaches and what happens when things go wrong. Our speakers are drawn from in-house, private practice and the Bar, and will offer their differing perspectives of implementing and advising on the GDPR.
The cost of attending this event is £10 + VAT (£12) for students and academics in full-time education. " 'via Blog this'

Saturday, 14 October 2017

OECD Digital Economy Outlook 2017 - en - OECD

OECD Digital Economy Outlook 2017 - en - OECD: "The biennial OECD Digital Economy Outlook examines and documents evolutions and emerging opportunities and challenges in the digital economy. It highlights how OECD countries and partner economies are taking advantage of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the Internet to meet their public policy objectives. Through comparative evidence, it informs policy makers of regulatory practices and policy options to help maximise the potential of the digital economy as a driver for innovation and inclusive growth." 'via Blog this'

Friday, 13 October 2017

The crooked timber of humanity | 1843

The crooked timber of humanity | 1843: "The world’s first national data network was constructed in France during the 1790s. It was a mechanical telegraph system, consisting of chains of towers, each of which had a system of movable wooden arms on top. Different configurations of these arms corresponded to letters, numbers and other characters. Operators in each tower would adjust the arms to match the configuration of an adjacent tower, observed through a telescope, causing sequences of characters to ripple along the line. Messages could now be sent much faster than letters, whizzing from one end of France to the other in minutes. The network was reserved for government use but in 1834 two bankers, Fran├žois and Joseph Blanc, devised a way to subvert it to their own ends." 'via Blog this'