Wednesday, 11 January 2017

Nominet: Policy Committee Members Biographies

View our Policy Committee Members Biographies: "A .UK Policy Stakeholder Committee has been set up to support and enable the policy process. Members of the Committee bring a range of experience representing a range of interests and will help in engaging stakeholders in the process." 'via Blog this'

Big UK ISPs to Send First Internet Piracy Warning Letters this Month - ISPreview UK

Big UK ISPs to Send First Internet Piracy Warning Letters this Month - ISPreview UK: "As part of this the ISPs have agreed to adopt a Voluntary Copyright Alert Programme (VCAP), which aims to “send millions of educational notices” to those detected by copyright owners as infringing their content via “unlawful” Peer-to-Peer (P2P) File-Sharing (e.g. BitTorrent) networks (these networks will often expose your IP address to the public Internet and Rights Holders can spot that).

 Unlike the bullying letters sent by dubious copyright protection firms (aka – “speculative invoicing“), the “alerts” issued by this new system will NOT contain any threats or demands for money and should only act as a tool for educating customers about the legal alternatives (Netflix and Spotify etc.). The idea is to discourage future infringement, as opposed to punishment." 'via Blog this'

Thursday, 5 January 2017

How To Write A Takedown Request Without Running Afoul of the Streisand Effect | Popehat

How To Write A Takedown Request Without Running Afoul of the Streisand Effect | Popehat: "No, Your Takedown Demand Is Not Copyrighted: Don't try to pull that ridiculous "I demand that you take down your post, and I demand that you not print this demand letter, because it is copyrighted." That's just stupid. Really, really stupid. That's begging for it to go full Streisand.

 I would sum up all of these points like this: when considering a takedown demand, take a "first do no harm" attitude. Make sure you understand what you're doing, and ask for help. Learn from the mistakes of the infamous." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, 3 January 2017

Cyberleagle: The Investigatory Powers Act - swan or turkey?

Cyberleagle: The Investigatory Powers Act - swan or turkey?: "Over 300 pages make up what then Prime Minister David Cameron described as the most important Bill of the last Parliament.

When it comes into force the IP Act will replace much of RIPA (the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000), described by David Anderson Q.C.’s report A Question of Trust as ‘incomprehensible to all but a tiny band of initiates’. It will also supersede a batch of non-RIPA powers that had been exercised in secret over many years - some, so the Investigatory Powers Tribunal has found, on the basis of an insufficiently clear legal framework. 


None of this would have occurred but for the 2013 Snowden revelations of the scale of GCHQ’s use of bulk interception powers. Two years post-Snowden the government was still acknowledging previously unknown (except to those in the know) uses of opaque statutory powers. 


Three Reviews and several Parliamentary Committees later, it remains a matter of opinion whether the thousands of hours of labour that went into the Act have brought forth a swan or a turkey." 'via Blog this'

Tuesday, 20 December 2016

Facebook charged with misleading EU over $22 billion WhatsApp takeover | Ars Technica

Facebook charged with misleading EU over $22 billion WhatsApp takeover | Ars Technica: "Brussels' competition officials issued a charge sheet against Facebook on Tuesday, in which it is alleged that the free content ad network failed to disclose that "the technical possibility of automatically matching Facebook users' IDs with WhatsApp users' IDs already existed" at the time of the merger.

 Antitrust chief Margerthe Vestager said that companies must provide "accurate information" during routine competition probes into planned acquisitions.

"They must take this obligation seriously," she said. "In this specific case, the commission's preliminary view is that Facebook gave us incorrect or misleading information during the investigation into its acquisition of WhatsApp. Facebook now has the opportunity to respond."

 Facebook has been slapped with a so-called Statement of Objections by the commission, which claims that the multinational "intentionally, or negligently, submitted incorrect or misleading information" to the competition wing of the EC, thereby allegedly breaching its obligations under the EU Merger Regulation." 'via Blog this'

Friday, 9 December 2016

Predictions 2017: the Impact of Communications Law

Predictions 2017: "Although it is highly likely that the various parts of the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 will be brought in in a phased manner, we can expect to see changes to the data retention framework imminently, given the sunset provision in DRIPA. Even though the legislation will be in final, enacted form, there will be plenty of work to do on the codes of practice, as well as ensuring that systems and processes meet the new legal requirements.

The Act will permit a broader range of obligations to be imposed on providers of private telecommunication systems than has been the case to date," 'via Blog this'

Monday, 28 November 2016

Open letter in the Daily Telegraph: Concerns with ‘information sharing’ provisions in the Digital Economy Bill

Open letter in the Daily Telegraph: Concerns with ‘information sharing’ provisions in the Digital Economy Bill | Information Law & Policy Centre: "The Bill puts government ministers in control of citizens’ personal data, a significant change in the relationship between citizen and state. It means that personal data provided to one part of government can be shared with other parts of government and private‑sector companies without citizens’ knowledge or consent.

 Government should be strengthening, not weakening, the protection of sensitive information, particularly given the almost daily reports of hacks and leaks of personal data. Legal and technical safeguards need to be embedded within the Bill to ensure citizens’ trust. There must be clear guidance for officials, and mechanisms by which they and the organisations with whom they share information can be held to account." 'via Blog this'